Run Types

Assessment (Perceived Effort)

This is a structured workout where you are asked to run at certain speeds and specific times according to your subjective level of effort.

You must complete a Perceived Effort assessment and then confirm it on the dashboard before TrainAsONE can continue with your plan.

A perceived effort run is one mechanism that enables TrainAsONE to understand your subjective effort of running and compare to the various underlying physiological processes being measured and tracked. Be honest and do not look at your device (apart from may be to see the time) - start your workout and then put your device in your pocket...

Currently there are 3 levels of effort: Standing, Conversational and Natural pace:

  • Standing: Not strictly a running pace... Stand still and relax for the specified duration. You may like to close your eyes and listen to your surroundings.
  • Conversational: Run at a pace where you can comfortably hold a conversation without getting short of breath. If you can run with a friend to help gauge this, then all the better. Else talk/sing to yourself...
  • Natural: Run at what you feel is an easy natural pace for you. For most people this is similar to above.

Notes:

  • Please record the whole session as one activity (run), including any pre-running and post-running standing phases.
  • If you have a heart rate monitor, it is very beneficial to wear it for this workout.
  • Any perceived effort run you perform that is not automatically categorised as such by the system (and you do not manually amend it to be) will result in the system continually re-scheduling a further one.

Assessment (3.2 km)

This is a structured workout incorporating a specific step where you are asked to run 3.2 Km in as quick a time as you possibly can.

The 3.2 Km assessment run provides extremely valuable information and insight into many aspects of your running and physiology. You are commonly asked to perform these at regular moments during your training. It is recommended to always perform them in the same place, ideally a straight and flat area that you can run fast and without any obstacles or interruption is obviously desired. In this way, you are more likely to perform at your best and each repeat of the assessment is directly comparable.

If you are new to speedwork, please take care running the 3.2 km workout step - we don't want you straining anything... Whilst the instruction is to 'run in as quick a time as you can', for the less experienced runner walking is permitted - the key thing is to travel the 3.2 Km in as short a time as you can.

Please note. Any 3.2 Km assessment run you perform that is not automatically categorised as such by the system (and you do not manually amend it to be) may result in the system continually re-scheduling a further one.

Assessment (6 min)

This is a structured workout incorporating a specific step where you are asked to run for 6 minutes, during which you should get as far a distance as you possibly can.

The 6 minute assessment run provides extremely valuable information and insight into many aspects of your running and physiology. You are commonly asked to perform these at regular moments during your training. It is recommended to always perform them in the same place - a 1 to 2 mile, ideally straight and flat area that you can run fast and without any obstacles or interruption is obviously desired. In this way, you are more likely to perform at your best and if you remember the place you got to you can use it as a target for the next time...

If you are new to speedwork, please take care running the 6 minute workout step - we don't want you straining anything... Whilst the instruction is to 'run as fast as you can', for the less experienced runner walking is permitted - the key thing is to travel as far in the 6 minutes as you can. The gifted and experienced runners should start to feel sick with about 1 to 2 minutes remaining - if you don't, you're probably not trying hard enough... ;-)

Please note. Any 6 minute assessment run you perform that is not automatically categorised as such by the system (and you do not manually amend it to be) may result in the system continually re-scheduling a further one.

Race (road) - best effort

This is a road race where you run to the best of your ability, most commonly the goal of your training.

A race predominantly on road, where you run to the best of your ability to achieve the best time over a defined distance.

Race (road) - casual

This is a road race where you run casually, such as pacing a slower runner.

A race predominantly on road, where you do not run to the best of your ability, but run casually, such as pacing a slower runner.

Race (trail) - best effort

This is a trail race where you run to the best of your ability, most commonly the goal of your training.

A race predominantly on trails, where you run to the best of your ability to achieve the best time over a defined distance.

Race (trail) - casual

This is a trail race where you run casually, such as pacing a slower runner.

A race predominantly on trails, where you do not run to the best of your ability, but run casually, such as pacing a slower runner.

Rest

This is a period of rest

Run/walk

A session consisting of a mixture of slow running and brisk walking.

This is useful for runners who cannot run for long durations, but want to maintain a longer aerobic session

Freestyle (general)

This is an unstructured run that does not fit with any other run type classification.

Currently TrainAsONE does not schedule any Freestyle runs. This category is used to categorise a run that does not fit into any of the other Run Types.

Freestyle (drills)

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Freestyle (Fartlek)

This is an adhoc training session. Fartlek, which means "speed play" in Swedish, and is a training method that blends continuous training with interval training.

Currently TrainAsONE does not schedule any Freestyle runs. This category is used to categorise a run that does not fit into any of the other Run Types.

Freestyle (hill repeats)

This is an adhoc training session containing a number of relatively short fast steps on hills with intervening periods of rest.

Currently TrainAsONE does not schedule any Freestyle runs. This category is used to categorise a run that does not fit into any of the other Run Types.

Freestyle (strides)

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Freestyle (interval)

This is an adhoc interval session containing a number of relatively short fast steps with intervening periods of rest.

Currently TrainAsONE does not schedule any Freestyle runs. This category is used to categorise a run that does not fit into any of the other Run Types.

Training (economy)

This run is at a steady pace designed to maximise the improvement in your running economy (calories consumed per kilometre)

The majority of your running is at a slow comfortable pace, where you run at an economical speed, consuming a relatively small number of calories per distance travelled. For most people this is a pace at which you can hold a conversation.

Running Economy is a measure of the cost of running. Think of it in terms of the amount of calories (or oxygen) required to run each kilomtere. A well trained athlete will have a lower measure of Running Economy than a less well trained one, i.e. they will be more economical, using less oxygen to run each kilometre at the same speed. A key aspect to improving running performance is to improve your economy. TrainAsONE has calculated not only what it believes is your Running Economy but also a pace, for your volume of training, that will induce maximal improvements.

When starting TrainAsONE, for the majority of the population, the Running Economy pace calculated is either just right or slightly slower than they tend to run (if you're the latter, slow down slightly....). However, for a small population of runners the pace specified may be further off. If you feel that you fall into this category, run at a your natural conversational pace and let TrainAsONE get to know you better. Naturally, contact us at any point if you have any questions or concerns.

When running on flat level terrain, your primary indicator of speed should be the indicated paces. If you find that your heart rate at the specified paces are falling significantly outside the corresponding heart rate bands, please notifiy us. However, when running on hilly terrain, you may find that converting to heart rate may be easier. The more experienced runner may prefer to simply run to subjective effort - if you can 'hit your pace' to within a few seconds per kilometer on the flat, your fall into this category.

Training (interval)

This is a structured workout containing a number of relatively short steps to be run fast with intervening periods of rest.

Whilst many people carry out some form of 'interval' training, more often than not, the structure of the session is ad-hoc and not personalised to them or their needs. Consequently, their training is not as effective or appropriate as it should be - commonly they are 'overdoing it' and not targetting the physiological systems interval training is designed for.

TrainAsONE is different - the paces and duration of the steps are specifically calculated for your physiology, to induce the best improvements in your performace. Intervals target changes in your aerobic capability whilst having an allied effect on your running economy. For the majority of people, the fast steps are from 30 seconds to 6 mintues with similar periods of rest in between.

Whilst the system gives heart rate ranges for all sections of this workout, it is preferable to run the fast bouts on flat level terrain according to pace. Heart rate can be used, but due to a number of factors (including heart rate lag) it is less favourable.

If you are new to speedwork, please take care running the fast workout steps - we don't want you straining anything...

Training (longest economy)

This run is at a steady pace designed to maximise the improvement in your running economy (calories consumed per kilometre)

This is your longest Economy run of the week.

The majority of your running is at a slow comfortable pace, where you run at an economical speed, consuming a relatively small number of calories per distance travelled. For most people this is a pace at which you can hold a conversation.

Running Economy is a measure of the cost of running. Think of it in terms of the amount of calories (or oxygen) required to run each kilomtere. A well trained athlete will have a lower running economy than a less well trained one, i.e. they will use less oxygen to run each kilometre at the same speed. A key aspect to improving running performance is to improve your economy. TrainAsONE has calculated not only what it believes is your running economy but also a pace, for your volume of training, that will induce maximal improvements.

When starting TrainAsONE, for the majority of the population, the Running Economy pace calculated is either just right or slightly slower than they tend to run (if you're the latter, slow down slightly....). However, for a small population of runners the pace specified may be further off. If you feel that you fall into this category, run at a your natural conversational pace and let TrainAsONE get to know you better. Naturally, contact us at any point if you have any questions or concerns.

When running on flat level terrain, your primary indicator of speed should be the indicated paces. If you find that your heart rate at the specified paces are falling significantly outside the corresponding heart rate bands, please notifiy us. However, when running on hilly terrain, you may find that converting to heart rate may be easier. The more experienced runner may prefer to simply run to subjective effort - if you can 'hit your pace' to within a few seconds per kilometer on the flat, your fall into this category.

Training (pickup)

A Pickup run is similar to a Long run, however, there is a section to be run at a faster than Economy pace.

A pickup run is most commonly scheduled in order to introduce fast pace (often near-race pace) running on 'tired legs' in the middle of a long run. They are introduced as an alternative to continually increasing long runs to further promote endurance, mitigate risk of injury, and give confidence.

When running on flat level terrain, your primary indicator of speed should be the indicated paces. If you find that your heart rate at the specified paces are falling significantly outside the corresponding heart rate bands, please notifiy us. However, when running on hilly terrain, you may find that converting to heart rate may be easier. The more experienced runner may prefer to simply run to subjective effort - if you can 'hit your pace' to within a few seconds per kilometer on the flat, your fall into this category.

Training (recovery)

Typically a recovery run is a slow short run the day after a long run.

In order to impart less stress and not hinder recovery from the preceeding long run a recovery run may be scheduled. It is ran at a slower pace than your normal economy runs, and is generally of shorter duration.

When running on flat level terrain, your primary indicator of speed should be the indicated paces. If you find that your heart rate at the specified paces are falling significantly outside the corresponding heart rate bands, please notifiy us. However, when running on hilly terrain, you may find that converting to heart rate may be easier. The more experienced runner may prefer to simply run to subjective effort - if you can 'hit your pace' to within a few seconds per kilometer on the flat, your fall into this category.

Training (repetition)

This is a structured workout containing a number of short steps to be run very fast with good periods of intervening rest.

Often incorrectly termed intervals by many, repetitions are different as they target alternate physiology. Whilst many people carry out some form of 'interval' training, more often than not, the structure of the session is ad-hoc and not personalised to them or their needs. Consequently, their training is not as effective or appropriate as it should be.

The paces and duration of the repetition steps are specifically calculated for your physiology, to induce the best improvements in your performace. Repetitions target changes in muscle strength and synergy whilst having an allied effect on your running economy. For the majority of people, the fast steps are from 30 to 60 seconds with around double the time for the intervening rest periods to allow near complete recovery.

Whilst the system gives heart rate ranges for all sections of this workout, it is preferable to run the fast bouts on flat level terrain according to pace. Heart rate can be used, but due to a number of factors (including heart rate lag) it is less favourable.

When not on a flat area, or better still a running track, hitting the ideals are hard. But unless you are going for gold (as they say) it just means that your potential performance gains drop by a fraction of a percent. In such situations, the advice is to run to a subjective level of pace, which for repetitions, you can't go far wrong with simply trying to run as fast as you can for each fast step. In addition, if you can't keep your pace for the required number of repetitions, then feel free to abandon them, and carry on the workout with the final easy section.

If you are new to speedwork, please take care running the fast workout steps - we don't want you straining anything...

Training (tabata)

This is a structured workout containing a number of very short steps to be run very fast with short periods of intervening rest.

Named after Dr. Izumi Tabata, the Japanese physician and researcher who invented it, Tabata is a form of interval training characterised by short but very high intensity steps with minimal rest between. These sessions have been shown to induce significant concominant changes to both the anaerobic and aerobic energy systems.

When running on flat level terrain, your primary indicator of speed should be the indicated paces. If you find that your heart rate at the specified paces are falling significantly outside the corresponding heart rate bands, please notifiy us. However, when running on hilly terrain, you may find that converting to heart rate may be easier. The more experienced runner may prefer to simply run to subjective effort - if you can 'hit your pace' to within a few seconds per kilometer on the flat, your fall into this category.

If you are new to speedwork, please take care running the fast steps - we don't want you straining anything...

Training (threshold)

This is a structured workout containing a number of long steps to be run at speed with relatively short periods of intervening rest.

One of the key indicators for performance over endurance events is a runner's Lactate Threshold/Turnpoint. For simplicity think of this as the pace at which any further increase in speed causes the amount of lactate in your blood to increase sharply. At these paces you are exhausting many metabolic processes and your ability to continue running (especially at speed) is reduced. Threshold sessions are designed to target an increase in the pace at which you 'hit' your lactate threshold/turnpoint.

Old school wisdom states that lactate is a by-product of your muscles working hard and the build-up is toxic, causing the familiar 'muscle-burn' and consequent degradation in performance. This 'myth', still toted today is wrong. Lactate is actually our friend, but that is another, and very long story.

Whilst the system gives heart rate ranges for all sections of this workout, it is preferable to run the fast bouts on flat level terrain according to pace. Heart rate can be used (particularly when running on hilly terrain), but due to a number of factors it is less favourable.

If you are new to speedwork, please take care running the fast workout steps - we don't want you straining anything...